Motorists say they’ll be driving less despite their reliance on cars

Motorists say they’ll be driving less despite their reliance on cars

British motorists are more reliant on their cars than this time last year but expect to drive fewer miles over the coming year. This is the conclusion of insurance expert Admiral in its forthcoming Annual Survey of British Motorists.

Admiral surveyed over 2,500 motorists and found that 39% of them said they could never live without their car, up from 35% in 2007. While the number who said they could possibly or definitely live without their car has fallen from 16% in 2007 to just 11% this year.

However despite motorists appearing to be as much in love with their cars as they ever have been, Admiral’s research does suggest the high price of fuel might be having an impact on car use. 16% said they expect to drive fewer miles over the next year, with only 9% saying they expect to drive more. In 2007, 10% said they expected their mileage to decrease in the subsequent year and 12% said they actually expected it to increase.

Admiral managing director, Sue Longthorn, said, “All the evidence suggests motorists are using their cars less, and this is probably because of the current high cost of fuel. What our survey shows is that despite planning to drive less miles, most motorists are not willing to give up their cars completely.”

Admiral’s research reveals motorists in different parts of the UK have different attitudes to how they use their cars. Those in Northern Ireland are most dependent on their cars, only 2% the province said they could possibly or definitely live without their car.

Not surprisingly, with such a comprehensive public transport system, motorists in London are the least dependent on their cars. 24% in the capital said they could possibly or definitely live without their car.

Northern Ireland was also the only part of the UK where more motorists said they expect their mileage to increase next year than decrease. At the other extreme 21% in London and 18% in both Scotland and the East of England said they expect their mileage to decrease.

Sue Longthorn, said, “Many Londoners are lucky they have an alternative to using their cars, for a lot of people a car is the only way they can get around conveniently.

“Our research suggests that if fuel costs continue to rise, some people are going to have to make a tough decision about how often they use their car.”

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